ComputerManArrowsandQuestions

exasperate vs exacerbate

Both of these words are rather difficult to pronounce, and they mean different things. * exasperate is often used as an adjective “exasperated” as well as a verb “exasperate”, where it means to “irritate”. If someone is exasperated, they are irritated by someone or something. * exacerbate is a verb that means to make a...

The Writing It Right For You Companies

Here’s our new Infomercial! Did you know that we are three companies in one? Writing It Right For You (WIRFY) Detroit Ink Publishing (DIP) Your Business Your Brand Creatively (YB2C) iMovie Infomercial from Pamela Hilliard Owens on Vimeo.       Posted with Blogsy

Apps I Use: RescueTime Update

If you are a freelancer, it is important that you keep track of your own time and productive activities, yet you don’t want to spend all day tracking time. In a previous post, I wrote about an app that I use to track what I do all day: RescueTime, an online app that is also...

Start 2015 with Great Courses from the EFA!

The Editorial Freelancers Association offers courses just for YOU every fall and spring. Here is a list of some of our upcoming classes: Editorial Freelancers Association December 31, 2014     QuickBooks Online for Freelancers Webinar Series, January 8 – 29 EFA’s newest webinar series introduces users to QuickBooks Online. Session I-Introduction to QuickBooks Online...

Daily Grammar Tip: everyday or every day?

The word “everyday” is an adjective; it modifies a noun, as in “…my everyday clothes.” However, when you are using the adverbial phrase “every day”, make sure that you write it as two words. How often do you eat breakfast? Hopefully, you eat breakfast every day; but you might set the table with your everyday...

The English Language is So Much Fun!

  If you think that English is confusing, you’re right! Luckily for you, though, the professional writers and editors at Writing It Right For You are here to help! Contact us with your writing, editing, or marketing project today!

In Memoriam: Dr. Maya Angelou

Writers, poets, educators, activists, and spoken-word artists the world over are in mourning today. Award-winning author, novelist, poet, educator, actress and activist, Dr. Maya Angelou has died at age 86. Dr. Angelou is best known for her award-winning writing, including “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” This seminal autobiographical work chronicles her life as a childhood...

Return back / Return

If you use “return back,” the expression is redundant. Using “return” is enough to express any idea. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”! Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Vintage point / Vantage point

“Vintage point” isn’t a correct expression. The spot from which you have a good view is a vantage point. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”! Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like...

Wreckless / Reckless

“Reckless” means not reckoning carefully all the hazards involved in an action. “Wreckless” is no more than a misspelling of the word reckless. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”! Visit Common Errors in...

Toe a fine line / Tread a fine line, toe the line

When you tread (or walk) a fine line, you are trying to keep your balance between two alternatives, rather as if you were walking carefully along a narrow tightrope. Neighbors have to tread a fine line between being friendly and being nosy. A related expression is “there is a fine line between” two alternatives: “there’s...

Bemuse / Amuse

Even if their sound is similar, their meanings are not. “Bemuse” means to confuse, and “amuse” means to entertain. Many times, some bemusing things can be very amusing. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You...

All ready / Already

This is a very easy one. “Already” is an adverb used to describe something that happened before certain time. “All ready” means “completely prepared.” See these examples: She was all ready before I got home for dinner. She had already dressed up when I got home. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing...

Subject to / Subjected to

Although these two expressions can sometimes be switched with only a slight change in meaning, they are not equivalent. To be subjected to some sort of treatment is to actually be treated in that way, usually in an objectionable way. But to be subject to a regulation, to taxes, to discussion, to inspection, to any...

Gauge / Gouge

“Gauge” is an unusual spelling in English, and the word frequently gets misspelled. Your spelling-checker will catch “gague” (believe it!), but won’t catch “gouge,” which occurs more often than you might think. It’s pretty easy to find a “tire pressure gouge” for sale on the Web. If the word you want has an A sound...