Category Archive: Usage

Dec 13

AM / PM

20130728-194957.jpg“AM” stands for Ante Meridiem, it’s a Latin phrase that means “before noon,” and “PM” Post Meridiem means “after noon.” You should avoid the expression “12:00 PM” to designate noon,  not only because it is incorrect, but because it can be confused with midnight . The same goes for “12:00 AM.” The correct will be “twelve noon” when you want to designate a precise time.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact theprofessionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2013/12/13/am-pm/

Dec 12

Tripple / Triple

Te correct word is “triple,” without double P. Don’t be confused with the verb “tipple”, which means drinking alcohol.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the

20130728-194957.jpg

professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2013/12/12/tripple-triple/

Dec 11

These are them / These are they

Most people won’t complain about either one, but if you want to stay on the good side of the grammar, you should use “these are they.” This is because the pronoun after the verb should be in the same grammatical form as the subject. ”They” is the subject pronoun, while “them” is an object pronoun, so you should opt for “these are they” instead of “these are them”.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the

20130728-194957.jpg

professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2013/12/11/these-are-them-these-are-they/

Dec 10

Nonplussed

“Nonplussed” is an adjective and applies when a person is  very confused about a situation and is unsure how to react. It does not mean that a person is calm or in control.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the

20130728-194957.jpg

professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2013/12/10/nonplussed/

Dec 09

advocate for/advocate

“Advocate” is a verb and it is also a noun. For example, if used as a noun, you can be an advocate of civil rights. If used as verb, you advocate (or not)  something/somebody. Example:

Noun: I am an advocate for factory workers.

Verb: I do not advocate the use of arms.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the

20130728-194957.jpg

professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2013/12/09/advocate-foradvocate/

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