Daily Blog Post: though, thought, through

Oh, our dear beloved English language! Isn’t it fun? The words though, thought, and through are often misspelled and mispronounced. The best recommendation we can give you for these three words is to take care when you write them and when you speak them. The second best recommendation we can offer is not to confuse...

Daily Grammar Post: admission/admittance

The word “admittance” is a noun that means permission or right to enter, while “admission” can be very similar: allowing someone enter or granting permission to enter. Admission can also mean an acknowledgement of the truth or a confession. If words and their meanings and usage confuse you, the experts at Writing It Right For...

Daily Grammar Tip: coronate or crown

People use “coronate” as a verb by mistaking it as related to coronation, however, “coronate” is actually not a real word. Instead “crown” can be used as a noun for the actual headpiece, and as a verb meaning to anoint someone with special significance. If you have questions about grammar or word usage, the experts...

Islams / Muslims

Islam is a religion and Muslims their followers. Therefore, the followers of Islam are called Muslims, not Islams. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”! Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like...

Prophecy / Prophesy

There is a slight difference between these two words. “Prophecy,” is a noun, a prediction. Meanwhile the verb “to prophesy”  means predicting something. When a prophet prophesies he or she utters prophecies. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because...

Alright / All right

Is it “all right” as two words or “alright” as one word? The word “alright” is a misspelling of “all right”, so you might want to use the correct two word phrase “all right” to indicate acceptace or accuracy. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at...

Insight / Incite

Insight is a noun, which means an understanding of something. It often carries the connotation of a clear understanding with an insider’s perspective. On the other hand, Incite is a verb that means to stimulate action, to rouse, or to stir up. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals...

Carat / Caret / Carrot / Karat

Ok let’s get this one straight out for once and for all! “Carrots” are those crunchy orange vegetables Bugs Bunny is so fond of, but usually this spelling gets misused for less familiar words which are pronounced the same or similar but have very different meanings. For example: Carat: A unit of mass equal to 200 mg and...

Bad / Badly

“I feel bad” is standard English, as in “This t-shirt smells bad” (not “badly”). “I feel badly” is an incorrect hyper-correction by people who think they know better than the masses. People who are happy can correctly say they feel good, but if they say they feel well, we know they mean to say they’re...

Crick / Creek

The dialectical pronunciation and spelling of “creek” as “crick” is very popular in some parts of the US, but the standard pronunciation of the word is the same as that of “creak.” If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You....

Pray / Prey

If you want a miracle, pray to God. If you’re a criminal, you prey on your victims. Incidentally, it’s “praying mantis,” not “preying mantis.” The insect holds its forefeet in a position suggesting prayer. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right...

Pore / Pour

When used as a verb, “pore” has the unusual sense of “scrutinize,” as in “She pored over her receipts.” If it’s coffee or rain, the stuff pours. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because...

Video / Film

Many of us can remember when portable transistorized radios were ignorantly called “transistors.” We have a tendency to abbreviate the names of various sorts of electronic technology (see “stereo” and “satellite”), often in the process confusing the medium with the content. Video is the electronic reproduction of images and applies to broadcast and cable television,...

Acrosst / Accrossed / Across

In some dialects, “acrosst” is a common misspelling of “across.” Also, the chicken may have crossed the road, but did so by walking across it. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters...

Back / Forward / Up in time

For most people you move an event forward by scheduling it to happen sooner, but other people imagine the event being moved forward into the future, postponed. This is what most—but not all—people mean by saying they want to move an event back—later. Usage is also split on whether moving an event up means making...