exasperate vs exacerbate

ComputerManArrowsandQuestionsBoth of these words are rather difficult to pronounce, and they mean different things.

* exasperate is often used as an adjective “exasperated” as well as a verb “exasperate”, where it means to “irritate”. If someone is exasperated, they are irritated by someone or something.

* exacerbate is a verb that means to make a situation worse.

Credit for these “Common Errors in English” to the Common Errors in English blog and calendar.

If you still get confused with English grammar and usage, please contact us, the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help!

daylight saving time vs daylight savings time

20130728-194957.jpgIn many parts of North America, the first Sunday in March is the official day to “Spring Forward” and set clocks ahead by one hour. The correct term for this annual event is “daylight saving time”, because that is the original purpose: to save an hour of daylight and use that hour at the end of the day in order to have more time to work. “Daylight savings time” is incorrect.
The English language experts here at Writing It Right For You look forward to work with you! Contact us today!

Pique, Peek, or Peak?

ComputerManArrowsandQuestionsThe word “pique” comes from the French and means to “excite”, as in to “pique one’s interest” [in something].

Use “peek” when sneaking a look at something.

When you arrive at the “peak” of something, you are at the top or uppermost point.

Still confused by the meanings of similar words in the English language? Let the professionals at Writing It Right For You help you out! Contact us today!

Daily Blog Post: though, thought, through

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Oh, our dear beloved English language! Isn’t it fun? The words though, thought, and through are often misspelled and mispronounced. The best recommendation we can give you for these three words is to take care when you write them and when you speak them. The second best recommendation we can offer is not to confuse “through” with “threw”!

If the spellings, meanings, or usage of words and phrases in the English language confuse you, the experts at Writing It Right For You are ready to help! Contact us!

Daily Grammar Tip: coronate or crown

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People use “coronate” as a verb by mistaking it as related to coronation, however, “coronate” is actually not a real word. Instead “crown” can be used as a noun for the actual headpiece, and as a verb meaning to anoint someone with special significance.

If you have questions about grammar or word usage, the experts at Writing It Right For You; we are ready to assist you with your writing and editing projects.

Islams / Muslims

Islam is a religion and Muslims their followers. Therefore, the followers of Islam are called Muslims, not Islams.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the

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professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

 

Prophecy / Prophesy

There is a slight difference between these two words. “Prophecy,” is a noun, a prediction. Meanwhile the verb “to prophesy”  means predicting something. When a prophet prophesies he or she utters prophecies.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the

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professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Alright / All right

Is it “all right” as two words or “alright” as one word? The word “alright” is a misspelling of “all right”, so you might want to use the correct two word phrase “all right” to indicate acceptace or accuracy.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.20130728-194957.jpg

Insight / Incite

Writing It Right For YouInsight is a noun, which means an understanding of something. It often carries the connotation of a clear understanding with an insider’s perspective.

On the other hand, Incite is a verb that means to stimulate actionto rouse, or to stir up.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Carat / Caret / Carrot / Karat

Writing It Right For You - English Grammar Usage TipsOk let’s get this one straight out for once and for all!

“Carrots” are those crunchy orange vegetables Bugs Bunny is so fond of, but usually this spelling gets misused for less familiar words which are pronounced the same or similar but have very different meanings.

For example:

  • Carat: A unit of mass equal to 200 mg and is used for measuring gemstones and pearls
    • example: This is undoubtedly a 100-carat diamond.
  • Caret: A mark used by an author or editor to indicate where something is to be inserted into a text
    • example: He marked a caret in the text.
  • Karat: The unit of measurement for the proportion of gold in an alloy; 18-karat gold is 75% gold; 24-karat gold is pure gold
    • example: The ring he gave me was made of 24 karat gold.

And carrots, well, they are good for your eyes, and they’re an orange vegetable and grow downwards into the ground.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Bad / Badly

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.“I feel bad” is standard English, as in “This t-shirt smells bad” (not “badly”). “I feel badly” is an incorrect hyper-correction by people who think they know better than the masses.

People who are happy can correctly say they feel good, but if they say they feel well, we know they mean to say they’re healthy.

However, you may impress your beloved more if you say “I need you really badly” rather than the less correct “I need you real bad.”

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Crick / Creek

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.The dialectical pronunciation and spelling of “creek” as “crick” is very popular in some parts of the US, but the standard pronunciation of the word is the same as that of “creak.”

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.

Pray / Prey

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.If you want a miracle, pray to God. If you’re a criminal, you prey on your victims.

Incidentally, it’s “praying mantis,” not “preying mantis.” The insect holds its forefeet in a position suggesting prayer.

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You.

We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Visit Common Errors in English for more tips like this.