Affect or Effect?

Affect and effect are two of the most-often confused words in the English language. The simple rule is: * affect spelled with an “a” is usually a verb that shows some kind of action. The simple definition of affect is “to influence” or “to make happen”. How will eating chocolate cake for every meal affect...

Daily Grammar Tip: cowered vs coward

The verb “cower” means to crouch down in fear, and “cowered” is the past tense of cower. A “coward” is a fearful or weak person; the word is a noun. Therefore, cowered (with a Nordic root) and coward (with a French root) may sound similar, and they may even have similar connotations, but they are different and...

Daily Grammar Tip: everyday or every day?

The word “everyday” is an adjective; it modifies a noun, as in “…my everyday clothes.” However, when you are using the adverbial phrase “every day”, make sure that you write it as two words. How often do you eat breakfast? Hopefully, you eat breakfast every day; but you might set the table with your everyday...

The English Language is So Much Fun!

  If you think that English is confusing, you’re right! Luckily for you, though, the professional writers and editors at Writing It Right For You are here to help! Contact us with your writing, editing, or marketing project today!

Daily Grammar Tip: PC computer/PC

        Saying or writing “PC computer” is redundant (repetitive) because “PC” stands for “personal computer”; the original “PC” was introduced by IBM. The Common Errors in English Usage  

Daily Blog Post: though, thought, through

Oh, our dear beloved English language! Isn’t it fun? The words though, thought, and through are often misspelled and mispronounced. The best recommendation we can give you for these three words is to take care when you write them and when you speak them. The second best recommendation we can offer is not to confuse...

Daily Grammar Post: admission/admittance

The word “admittance” is a noun that means permission or right to enter, while “admission” can be very similar: allowing someone enter or granting permission to enter. Admission can also mean an acknowledgement of the truth or a confession. If words and their meanings and usage confuse you, the experts at Writing It Right For...

Daily Grammar Tip: coronate or crown

People use “coronate” as a verb by mistaking it as related to coronation, however, “coronate” is actually not a real word. Instead “crown” can be used as a noun for the actual headpiece, and as a verb meaning to anoint someone with special significance. If you have questions about grammar or word usage, the experts...

similar to/different from

Disclaimer: You know that I am an English teacher, don’t you? Welcome to your English lesson for today: how to correctly use these two common phrases. Recently I have heard these prepositional phrases used incorrectly. What is a prepositional phrase, you ask? That question has a simple answer: it is a phrase (an incomplete sentence)...

AM / PM

“AM” stands for Ante Meridiem, it’s a Latin phrase that means “before noon,” and “PM” Post Meridiem means “after noon.” You should avoid the expression “12:00 PM” to designate noon,  not only because it is incorrect, but because it can be confused with midnight . The same goes for “12:00 AM.” The correct will be “twelve noon” when you want...

Tripple / Triple

Te correct word is “triple,” without double P. Don’t be confused with the verb “tipple”, which means drinking alcohol. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”! Visit Common Errors in English for more tips...

These are them / These are they

Most people won’t complain about either one, but if you want to stay on the good side of the grammar, you should use “these are they.” This is because the pronoun after the verb should be in the same grammatical form as the subject. “They” is the subject pronoun, while “them” is an object pronoun, so you...

Nonplussed

“Nonplussed” is an adjective and applies when a person is  very confused about a situation and is unsure how to react. It does not mean that a person is calm or in control. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to...

advocate for/advocate

“Advocate” is a verb and it is also a noun. For example, if used as a noun, you can be an advocate of civil rights. If used as verb, you advocate (or not)  something/somebody. Example: Noun: I am an advocate for factory workers. Verb: I do not advocate the use of arms. If you need writing or...

Error / Err

“Err” is a verb, it means: “To make an error or a mistake”, therefore, we should use “Err” when we commit an “Error”.  The correct expression is “to err is human.” If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because...