Daily Grammar Tip: PC computer/PC

        Saying or writing “PC computer” is redundant (repetitive) because “PC” stands for “personal computer”; the original “PC” was introduced by IBM. The Common Errors in English Usage  

Happy Spring! Is it an equinox or a solstice?

Happy Spring Equinox! It’s the official first day of spring, FINALLY! We are re-publishing this post to celebrate the Spring Equinox in the northern hemisphere. Here is another word pair that is often misused or misunderstood. Both words define the annual path of the Sun.   “equinox”: there are two sets of days of the...

similar to/different from

Disclaimer: You know that I am an English teacher, don’t you? Welcome to your English lesson for today: how to correctly use these two common phrases. Recently I have heard these prepositional phrases used incorrectly. What is a prepositional phrase, you ask? That question has a simple answer: it is a phrase (an incomplete sentence)...

AM / PM

“AM” stands for Ante Meridiem, it’s a Latin phrase that means “before noon,” and “PM” Post Meridiem means “after noon.” You should avoid the expression “12:00 PM” to designate noon,  not only because it is incorrect, but because it can be confused with midnight . The same goes for “12:00 AM.” The correct will be “twelve noon” when you want...

Tripple / Triple

Te correct word is “triple,” without double P. Don’t be confused with the verb “tipple”, which means drinking alcohol. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”! Visit Common Errors in English for more tips...

These are them / These are they

Most people won’t complain about either one, but if you want to stay on the good side of the grammar, you should use “these are they.” This is because the pronoun after the verb should be in the same grammatical form as the subject. “They” is the subject pronoun, while “them” is an object pronoun, so you...

Nonplussed

“Nonplussed” is an adjective and applies when a person is  very confused about a situation and is unsure how to react. It does not mean that a person is calm or in control. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to...

advocate for/advocate

“Advocate” is a verb and it is also a noun. For example, if used as a noun, you can be an advocate of civil rights. If used as verb, you advocate (or not)  something/somebody. Example: Noun: I am an advocate for factory workers. Verb: I do not advocate the use of arms. If you need writing or...

Error / Err

“Err” is a verb, it means: “To make an error or a mistake”, therefore, we should use “Err” when we commit an “Error”.  The correct expression is “to err is human.” If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because...

orient vs orientate

“Orient” and “orientate” are both verbs that mean “to position yourself” in a particular situation or environment. “Orient” as a noun refers to countries in the eastern hemisphere, particularly Asian countries, and the original meaning of the verb orient was to position yourself facing the east towards the rising sun. In today’s common meaning of...

hairbrained or harebrained?

Many people use the more common “hairbrained”, but the correct and original spelling is “harebrained”, meaning a “silly rabbit”. Contact the writing and editing professionals at Writing It Right For You for assistance with your grammar questions!

Insight / Incite

Insight is a noun, which means an understanding of something. It often carries the connotation of a clear understanding with an insider’s perspective. On the other hand, Incite is a verb that means to stimulate action, to rouse, or to stir up. If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals...

Carat / Caret / Carrot / Karat

Ok let’s get this one straight out for once and for all! “Carrots” are those crunchy orange vegetables Bugs Bunny is so fond of, but usually this spelling gets misused for less familiar words which are pronounced the same or similar but have very different meanings. For example: Carat: A unit of mass equal to 200 mg and...

Bad / Badly

“I feel bad” is standard English, as in “This t-shirt smells bad” (not “badly”). “I feel badly” is an incorrect hyper-correction by people who think they know better than the masses. People who are happy can correctly say they feel good, but if they say they feel well, we know they mean to say they’re...

Crick / Creek

The dialectical pronunciation and spelling of “creek” as “crick” is very popular in some parts of the US, but the standard pronunciation of the word is the same as that of “creak.” If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, Contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You....