Category Archive: Report Writing

Nov 07

Who or Whom? (Updated)

Who or Whom?

No, this is not an owl impression.  These are two words so similar, they’ve sparked debate among the most esteemed of writers and educators. They are also very often misused by the general population.

Even though “whom” sounds very formal, there are specific rules for its use. Whom is a pronoun that refers to someone not directly in the conversation or statement.

It is also a pronoun used as the “object” of a sentence, that is, it is usually used with a directing preposition. “To whom does this belong?” “To whom it may concern:” “With whom did you speak the last time you were here?” Notice that when using “whom”, the person is usually unknown as well as not present.

“Who” can be used as the subject of a sentence or question: “Who are you?”  “Do you know who is coming tonight?”

“Who” can also be used as a function word to introduce a subject, “my father, who is a lawyer, never reacted badly to stress”. There is another version of who, that like whom, can be used when asking a question.  “Whoever broke the vase is in big trouble.”

“Who” should always be used in place of “that” when referring to people. “There are many people who enjoy family celebrations.” “There are many of us who are waiting for the movie to start.”

“That” is used for inanimate objects and non-persons. “These are the dogs that are available for adoption.”

Whom Fun Fact:  Did you know writers the world over for a long time (1870 to present day), thought that usage of the word whom would disappear as it’s mostly familiar in Shakespearean and, even older, a biblical turn of phrase.  However, this debate is still ongoing.

“It Matters How You Say It!”

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2012/11/07/who_or_whom/

Jun 01

Hyphens

I don’t know how many times I’ve gotten points knocked off of a paper’s score because of hyphen misuse.  Here are a few golden rules:

  • If you aren’t sure a compound noun is two words, look it up!  The dictionary is one of the best friends you could ever have.  If your new best friend doesn’t have the word, use a hyphen.
  • When using more than one adjective as a single thought, use a hyphen to separate them before the noun.
  • If you can correctly use ‘and’ between two adjectives, do so and skip the hyphen.
  • For numbers, always hyphenate the compound numerals when writing them out.

Those are a few of the rules that won’t steer you wrong.

If you need writing assistance, contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It!”

 

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2011/06/01/hyphens/

Mar 30

Different from/Different than

Is there a difference (pun totally intended)?  Yes.  First, as always, let’s look into the explanation.  ‘Different’ is a word used to contrast, rather than (tee hee) compare.  ‘Than’ usually follows adjectives used to compare people, items, conditions, etc.

Examples: More than, less thanbetter thanworse thancolder than and many more.

  • CORRECT: The birthday party was different than I expected.
  • INCORRECT: The birthday party was different from what I expected.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • When creating a sentence if a noun comes after ‘different’, use ‘from.’
  • When creating a sentence where a clause (subject and verb) follow ‘different’, use than.

If you need assistance with the very confusing English language rules, contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It!”

 

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2011/03/30/different-fromdifferent-than/

Mar 17

What We Do: Blog & Website Content

After brainstorming all night and day for weeks or months, you are finally ready to launch your company’s website/blog…or so you thought.  When you have to explain your product or service to people who have never heard of it, what will you say?  How will you explain it?  Will it sound good?  Is it easily understandable?

Grab the sides of your head, stop the spinning!  The team at Writing It Right For You is more than happy to work directly with you.  We will make sure we have a firm grasp of what you are offering and the tone you wish to set with your audience.

“The task was greatly executed. The project is done and it is featured at my profile. Further requests were also done in a quick and professional mode. Pamela is a great writer with professional approach and understanding of clients’ wishes.”   –Anton Konovalov: Entrepreneur, Thailand

If you need assistance with communicating with your customers, contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2011/03/17/what-we-do-blog-website-content/

Jan 06

Title Capitalization

Situation: Student receives draft of Political Science paper back, complete with seemingly endless little red marks.  The problem, improper recognition of people’s titles.  Before turning in the final draft for a grade, see this post!

There are several rules to consider when capitalizing:

  • Mail: Capitalize a title when it comes behind a name on the signature or address line.
  • Government: Capitalize high-ranking official’s titles when used with their names or placed before the name.
    • If the name is not used, don’t capitalize.
  • General: Capitalize when addressing directly, even if no name is mentioned.

Using these simple rules,  you can show Professor So-and-So that you know what’s what!

If you need writing or editing assistance with the very confusing English language rules, contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We’re here to help because “It Matters How You Say It”!

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2011/01/06/title-capitalization/

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