Are you a grammar nerd?

How many of these attributes apply to you? Being a grammar nerd is fun, isnt’ it? Posted from WordPress for Android

Daily Grammar Tip: suffer from vs suffer with

In normal usage we suffer “from” a disease; we do not suffer “with” a disease. We and our diseases are not pals… If you would like assistance with spelling, grammar, or word usage, contact the professionals at Writing It Right For You. We look forward to working with you!

ComputerManArrowsandQuestions

exasperate vs exacerbate

Both of these words are rather difficult to pronounce, and they mean different things. * exasperate is often used as an adjective “exasperated” as well as a verb “exasperate”, where it means to “irritate”. If someone is exasperated, they are irritated by someone or something. * exacerbate is a verb that means to make a...

Conjunctions: It’s All About Joining

“Conjunction.” One of my favorite words. As most of remember from grammar or primary school, a conjunction is a word that connects parts of a sentence. However, did you know there are several different types of conjunctions? The original type of conjunction that we were all taught is called a “coordinating conjunction”: and, but, or,...

Pique, Peek, or Peak?

The word “pique” comes from the French and means to “excite”, as in to “pique one’s interest” [in something]. Use “peek” when sneaking a look at something. When you arrive at the “peak” of something, you are at the top or uppermost point. Still confused by the meanings of similar words in the English language?...

Affect or Effect?

Affect and effect are two of the most-often confused words in the English language. The simple rule is: * affect spelled with an “a” is usually a verb that shows some kind of action. The simple definition of affect is “to influence” or “to make happen”. How will eating chocolate cake for every meal affect...

Daily Grammar Tip: cowered vs coward

The verb “cower” means to crouch down in fear, and “cowered” is the past tense of cower. A “coward” is a fearful or weak person; the word is a noun. Therefore, cowered (with a Nordic root) and coward (with a French root) may sound similar, and they may even have similar connotations, but they are different and...

Happy Spring! Is it an equinox or a solstice?

Happy Spring Equinox! It’s the official first day of spring, FINALLY! We are re-publishing this post to celebrate the Spring Equinox in the northern hemisphere. Here is another word pair that is often misused or misunderstood. Both words define the annual path of the Sun.   “equinox”: there are two sets of days of the...

similar to/different from

Disclaimer: You know that I am an English teacher, don’t you? Welcome to your English lesson for today: how to correctly use these two common phrases. Recently I have heard these prepositional phrases used incorrectly. What is a prepositional phrase, you ask? That question has a simple answer: it is a phrase (an incomplete sentence)...

Scrivener is the #1 App for All of my Writing Projects

I am a writer. I am an editor. I am a manuscript preparer and an eBook publisher. I am a social media marketing and branding consultant. For all of those roles that I manage for my three businesses, I do a lot of writing. I write on my MacBook Air from my home office and...

orient vs orientate

“Orient” and “orientate” are both verbs that mean “to position yourself” in a particular situation or environment. “Orient” as a noun refers to countries in the eastern hemisphere, particularly Asian countries, and the original meaning of the verb orient was to position yourself facing the east towards the rising sun. In today’s common meaning of...

glimpse or glance?

Here is another noun-verb word pair that can sometimes be confusing. The word “glimpse” is a noun that describes the act of seeing something quickly. A “glance” is an action verb that refers to taking a fast look at something. You glance over your shoulder to get a glimpse of the commotion behind you.  ...

hairbrained or harebrained?

Many people use the more common “hairbrained”, but the correct and original spelling is “harebrained”, meaning a “silly rabbit”. Contact the writing and editing professionals at Writing It Right For You for assistance with your grammar questions!

Its or It’s

I posted this a while ago but I felt like it needed to be posted again as I still see so many people making this error. So, these two terms are relatively simple to use.  Proper placement is EVERYTHING here. Of course, the definition is most important.  To define each of these equally confusing terms,...

Etymology: Camouflage

etymology: the study of word origins Use of the word camouflage originated in Paris in the late 19th century. It is a combination of the Italian word camuffare, which means “to disguise”, and the French word camouflet, which means “a puff of smoke”. Back in ol’ Par-ee in the 1870s, thieves would put an attractive woman in a...