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Nov 30

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famous or infamous?

Question PersonMany people confuse these two terms. Of course you know that “famous” means well-known, celebrated, having a favorable reputation–one of the base words for famous is “fame”. But many people mistakenly assume that “infamous” means, even more famous; however, infamous is the opposite of famous. If someone is infamous, that person has a negative reputation or is known for bad deeds.

Being “famous” is positive; being “infamous” is negative. Please do not use “infamous” when referring to a person very well known for good reasons.

If you need assistance with using the correct terms for your writing projects, contact the pros at Writing It Right For You. We’ll be glad to help you become famous!

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