Monthly Archive: January 2012

Jan 20

Today’s Question: What is the difference between cement and concrete?

Question Person

“Cement” is any chemical binding agent that makes things stick to it or stick to each other. Glue, mortar, and paste are examples of cement.

“Concrete” is a construction material consisting of cement, water, and crushed granules such as sand, gravel, or stone. 

The root of cement is the Latin caenentum meaning quarry stone.

The writers and editors at Writing It Right For You can help you choose the right word, because we know that “It Matters How You Say It!”

Are there any word pairs that confuse you every time? Let us know in the Comments!

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2012/01/20/todays-question-what-is-the-difference-between-cement-and-concrete/

Jan 16

Celebrating the Legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Most people have at least heard bits and pieces of the “I Have a Dream” Speech delivered by Dr. King in Washington, D.C. on August 25, 1963. But how many have actually read the entire text of the speech? By focusing only on a few of the famous lines, it is possible to miss the entire context. Offered here for you is the entire text; I would encourage you to read it and to evaluate it within the context of the times and also to focus on what can be done today to continue the work and legacy of Dr. King.

 

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check — a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

As we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied, as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating “For Whites Only”. We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.”

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2012/01/16/celebrating-the-legacy-of-rev-dr-martin-luther-king-jr/

Jan 12

Navigating the Social Media Maze

This clever graphic is making the rounds on the Internet, but lurking behind the joke is the reality that the world of online social media is a confusing jumble. Whether you’re trying to build your brand as an individual or a business, understanding the different social networking sites can help you navigate the maze effectively.

The central marketing problem facing all my clients is this: they are so busy doing the actual work of operating their business that they lack the time, energy and focus to think about how best to communicate what they’re doing to the world.

As an online marketing consultant, I take the time to get to know each of my clients and understand what it is they do, what differentiates them from their competitors, and who are the prospective customers they are seeking to attract. Only then do I begin to map out an online marketing strategy, because one size definitely does not fit all.

My clients don’t have to concern themselves with maintaining a website and posting updates to Facebook or Twitter, nor do they need to worry about pageviews, clickthroughs and the other metrics by which online exposure is measured. They can count on me to communicate an authentic story of their unique strengths, and deliver it to the right online outlets at the right time to reach the right audience.

If you’d like to learn more about how Writing It Right For You can manage your online presence to grow your business, contact us today for a consultation!

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2012/01/12/navigating-the-social-media-maze/

Jan 04

Happy New Year! I Resolve…

2011 to 2012One of the blogs I regularly read is “All Freelance Writing” by Jennifer Mattern. Jennifer, a wonderful role model for freelance writers like me, published a 2012 New Year’s Resolutions blog post the other day. I would like to use her model to publicly state my 2012 resolutions for Writing It Right For You:

1) Make and meet my schedule for all of my websites, my blogs, my upcoming ebooks, and other personal and business projects.

Just like Jennifer, I asked another freelance writer friend, Sharon Hurley Hall how she gets so much written every day. Sharon, who has written two guest posts for this blog, recommended Dragon Dictate, which Jennifer and I have installed, but haven’t used to its full potential. So one of my goals is to really put Dragon Dictate to use to help me write more and faster.

My husband and business partner, Keith Owens, and I have four books almost ready, and our goal is to have them published by the end of this quarter.

2) Ensure a minimum 25% increase in my monthly base income.

I actually declared this resolution last week in a tweet, but I am res-stating that goal here. Our company did pretty well last year, but like all freelancers, our monthly gross income fluctuates–often wildly by thousands of dollars. But we also have several regular and ongoing clients and graduate and post-graduate students–bless ‘em–on retainer; they are the ones who provide us with our monthly base income. That monthly base income from retainers is what we will increase this year by 25%.

3) Finalize the revised look and feel of our websites and blogs. 

As many freelancers and small business owners know–especially when you have lots of wonderful clients to work with, it is difficult to stay on track with the other non-income-producing projects that are important but not critical. What I have done is make a project list for each one of the administrative and personal projects I want to complete and I add tasks to those lists as I think of them. Then when I have scheduled open slots in my schedule, I tackle each project one task at a time. That really relieves my stress levels–the only way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time. The same is true for completing all of those projects vying for your attention.

4) Complete the remodeling and re-working of my home office.

Again, this is a work in progress. I know and I have visually (with before/after photos) set up how I want my office to look. It will be a lot of work to totally finish my office, but my goal is to greet spring with a newly remodeled office. Let’s see, that is about March 21 here in the northern hemisphere. I’ll post pictures when that goal is met.

5) Continue to find the right balance between work-family-community.

I LOVE what I do and I am very grateful that my work reflects my passions, my values, and my skills. But again, like all freelancers and SOHO (Small Office Home Office) business owners, I constantly must ensure that I do more than just “work”–especially when my commute to my office is about 5 feet! It is very easy to work all of the time, blur the boundary between home and office, and be constantly connected with all of my computers and gadgets . So this year, I will work especially hard to find the right balance between everything I love to do–and I will try to actually “unplug” for a while every day!

Jennifer had 1o (!) resolutions, but I will stick with 5. That is enough for me!

What are your resolutions for your business in 2012? Do you have any tips or apps or methods that have been successful for you? Let us know in the comment section! Happy New Year!

 

(This post is cross-published to my BlogHer Blog…)

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Permanent link to this article: http://writingitrightforyou.com/home/2012/01/04/happy-new-year-i-resolve/