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Apr 19

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It’s “email” not “e-mail”

English is an ever-changing language and sometimes it is hard to keep up with the changes for acceptable usage; especially for writers and academics. The Associated Press is one of the standards for correct usage, and through its AP Stylebook, the AP constantly issues updates to English words and phrases for the United States.

One recent change was “email”. Most of us have spelled it with a hyphen (e-mail), but according to the AP Stylebook Online, you should no longer insert that hyphen in “email”. The recent press release from AP explains it:

email Acceptable in all references for electronic mail. Many email or Internet addresses use symbols such as the at symbol (@), or the tilde (~) that cannot be transmitted correctly by some computers. When needed, spell them out and provide an explanatory editor’s note. Use a hyphen with other e- terms: e-book, e-business, e-commerce.

If you do a lot of writing and/or editing, it would be beneficial to sign up with the AP Stylebook Online to keep apprised of all of the changes in English usage and spelling.

If you need assistance with your writing, editing, book proposals, or academic submissions, make sure to contact the writers and editors at Writing It Right For You.

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